Problems when starting your lawn mower

Like most home owners who do their own mowing, you probably will discover by the time springtime comes that your equipment is a lot harder to start. If you have an electric start lawn mower, you probably will think, “Man, this thing has electric start and it still seems dead. Good think I do not have one of those manual start versions.”

You’re probably going to attempt to start your lawn mower for a couple of times with the choke on. Perhaps after that your “helpful” neighbour will drop by and tell you that you likely flooded the engine. So you’re probably going to try to start your equipment a few times with the accelerator opened up and the choke off. If you’ve got a manual machine, you were probably chewing over your chiropractic bill that is at hand. And wondering whether hiring the neighbour’s kid to mow your yard might not be such a bad idea all things considered.

Can it really be so difficult to start an engine that’s been sitting idle for half a year? If you analyze the spark plug, you might determine the issue. If you take a look at the point of the spark plug, it is going to probably look good to you. But you’ll probably discover that your lawn mower will begin in seconds if you replace that spark plug with a fresh clean dry spark plug.

Check the lawn mower spark plug

The key to the puzzle lies in something at the microscopic level that occurs at first glance of the ceramic insulator of a spark plug in a machine that’s kept outside. As the relative humidity and temperature change, cycles and the temperature, day after day micro-droplets condense on and re-evaporate from the surface of the ceramic insulator of your spark plug.

The carbon particles do not fairly short things outside, but they supply a route whose electrical resistance is low enough so that there’s no discharge. Or the discharge has so little energy that the charge in the cylinder will not ignite. Once the engine starts, the heat of the burns within the calendar clears up this issue in a couple of minutes. So it starts good when you try to start the engine the following week.

Common fixes for the lawn mower spark plug

While holding the end of the spark plug that normally links to the spark plug cable, stick another end (the discharge end) of the spark plug into the fire for several seconds while rotating the spark plug several times. This will warm the centre electrode and the surrounding ceramic. This just takes several seconds. Have a look at the ceramic substance encircling the centre electrode after you take the spark plug from the fire.

One simple option to address this starting issue would be to replace the spark plug. Obviously, if you want more a affordable alternative that does not necessitate a trip to the shop, I have one for you, and it comes in the form of a fire that is hot. You see, there’s a rationale why the ceramic insulator surrounding the center electrode of your spark plug consists of the specific substance it’s manufactured from. When the ceramic gets hot, the surface properties of that stuff really catalyze the burning off of carbon deposits. Needless to say, when your lawn mower has not yet started, nothing has yet gotten it “hot enough”.

While holding the end of the lawn mower spark plug that normally links to the spark plug cable, stick another end (the discharge end) of the spark plug into the fire for several seconds while rotating the spark plug several times. This will warm the centre electrode and the surrounding ceramic. It just takes several seconds. Have a look at the ceramic substance encircling the centre electrode after you take the spark plug from the fire.

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